Dog license

Pennsylvania dog license fee bill would increase costs by an average of $ 3.50

Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding said if a license fee increase is not approved, more taxpayer money will have to be diverted to services.

HARRISBURG, Pa. (WKBN) – Pennsylvanians are at a crossroads when it comes to caring for the state’s dog population.

Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding said if a license fee increase is not approved, more taxpayer money will have to be diverted to services for stray and dangerous dogs with minimal staff.

“With dog guards so stretched out, we are relying more and more on municipal support,” Redding said. “Free-range dogs cause local problems that are felt in your neighborhoods. But public complaints remain on the back burner as wardens scramble to keep up with mandatory kennel inspections, increasing the burden on local government resources.

In addition to tracking down lost animals, picking up stray animals and investigating dog attacks, animal workers are also required to inspect nearly 3,000 kennels and breeding facilities across the state.

The Pennsylvania dog license fee, which is supposed to support pet agencies, has been the same for 25 years, but costs have gone up.

State Senator Judy Schwank (D-Berks) and State Representative Eddie Day Pashinski (D-Luzerne) presented two corresponding pieces of legislation, Senate Bill 232 and Bill 526, to increase dog license fees by a minimum amount that would adequately fund the office to continue to protect both dogs and the public in Pennsylvania.

A minimal increase in fees – say for a neutered dog would go from $ 6.50 to $ 10 per year – will benefit Pennsylvanians in general. The invoices will also require the puppies to be allowed at 8 weeks or the same age that they are legally allowed to be sold. This efficiency is expected to increase puppy license sales and further stabilize the office.