Dog breeds

Demand for larger dog breeds skyrockets as lockdowns push families toward more spacious homes

Demand for larger dog breeds soars as families who moved to the countryside during the Covid pandemic have more room for pets, expert says

  • Six of the ten breeds that grew in popularity last year were rated as ‘large’
  • Those that saw an increase included English setters, giant schnauzers and the akita
  • The lockdown has pushed people out of cities for bigger, more rural homes
  • Larger dogs are “striking to look at”; however, they take up more space in homes

They take up a little more room on the couch, but big dogs are back in fashion

Six of the ten breeds that grew in popularity last year in Kennel Club registrations were rated as “large.”

Topping that list was the Pyrenean Mountain Dog, which weighs up to 165 pounds.

Bill Lambert, a spokesman for Crufts, which is organized by the Kennel Club, said the increase could be due to families finding more space after leaving cities and towns during the pandemic.

Other popular breeds include the English setter – a vulnerable native breed that has seen a 109% increase in registrations – as well as the giant schnauzer, chow chow and akita.

Demand for larger dog breeds – including the English setter (pictured) – has skyrocketed during Covid, possibly due to families moving to larger rural homes

The Old English Sheepdog, which featured in Dulux advertisements, placed ninth as its growing popularity no longer made it a vulnerable native breed.

The most popular breeds in Britain are Labradors, French Bulldogs, Cocker Spaniels, Bulldogs and Miniature Smooth Dachshunds.

Mr Lambert told The Sunday Telegraph: ‘Perhaps puppy buyers resisted the urge to go with the more obvious choices, and instead used lockdown and time at home to properly research their new member of the four-legged family and find the one that best suits their lifestyle.”

The Old English Sheepdog (pictured), which featured in Dulux adverts, came ninth as its growing popularity no longer made it a vulnerable native breed

The Old English Sheepdog (pictured), which featured in Dulux adverts, came ninth as its growing popularity no longer made it a vulnerable native breed

Six of the ten breeds that grew in popularity in Kennel Club registrations last year were ranked as

Six of the ten breeds that grew in popularity last year in Kennel Club registrations were rated as “large.” Pictured: A white Miniature Bull Terrier

Ali Taylor, dog behavior and training manager at Battersea Dogs and Cats Home, told the Mail: ‘It’s no wonder big dogs have grown in popularity; not only are they striking to look at, but they can also make incredibly loving and rewarding pets.

“Larger breeds may take up a little more room on your sofa, but that’s only because more of them love!”

Crufts, which is organized by the Kennel Club, begins this year on Thursday and will run until March 13.

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